Judge Ushir Pandit-Durant is one of the likely Democratic nominees for Queens Supreme Court, Civil Term, sources say. // Eagle file photo

These Are the Likely Democratic Nominees for Queens Supreme Court, Sources Say

Ahead of Thursday’s County Democratic party judicial convention, where party delegates will vote on the party’s nominees for Queens Supreme Court, Civil Term, two sources confirmed the four judges who will be nominated.

The nominees are Civil Court Judge Maureen Healy, Civil Court Judge Larry Love, Civil Court Judge Robert Caloras and Civil Court Judge Ushir Pandit-Durant, the sources said.

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A police cruiser is towed in Far Rockaway. // Photo by Jason Lawrence

Crooked Cops ‘Dishonor Badge’ By Aiding Prostitution Ring, Brown Says

They’re supposed to serve and protect the everyday citizens of New York City, not sex traffickers and brothel owners. And for that, they may be going to prison.

Seven current NYPD officers and retired NYPD Vice Detective Ludwig Paz were indicted in Queens County Criminal Court yesterday for allegedly running a lucrative prostitution and gambling ring in Queens, Brooklyn and Long Island. Overall, 49 people were charged.

Queens District Attorney Richard Brown announced the charges in a statement Thursday.

“Today’s indictments of one former detective and seven current police officers of the NYPD dishonor the badge,” Brown said. “The main culprit in this case — a retired detective — allegedly used his knowledge of the inner workings of the New York City Police Department to run a string of brothels in Queens, Brooklyn and Hempstead, Long Island.”

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Justice Jeremy Weinstein, administrative judge of the Queens County Supreme County, Civil Term. // Photo courtesy of Civil Court

For Judge Weinstein, Pride Comes In ‘Making Things Work’

State Supreme Court Justice Jeremy Weinstein, the administrative judge in the Queens County Civil term, has accomplished a tremendous amount in his nearly 25 years on the bench.

Weinstein created a dedicated Matrimonial Part to address issues related to child support, visitation and related financial issues. He oversaw the development of a Foreclosure Part and a free Uncontested Matrimonial Clinic, where people receive assistant in uncontested divorces with no property, support or custody issues.

He even got the city to repair the civil courthouse’s broken elevator system that had long forced staff and litigants to climb several flights of stairs just to have their day in court.

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Ice cream trucks have wracked up hundreds of noise complaints to 311. // Eagle photo by Mary Frost

Ice Cream Headache: Jamaica Leads NYC In Jingle Complaints

Jamaica residents are fed up with ice trucks. And they’re giving the cold shoulder to Mr. Softee’s familiar tune.

At least according to 311 complaint information compiled by the New York City database Localize.city.

Roughly 1,279 complaints were filed throughout New York City between August 2017 and August 2018. The region around Captain Tilly Park in Jamaica had the highest number of complaints. Localize.city reported that residents around Captain Tilly Park — along with “clusters” around Highland Avenue and Ava Place and 170th Street near 89th and 90th Avenues —  filed ice-cream truck song complaints with 311 on 61 days over the past year.

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Eric Allen, president of the Association of Surrogates and Supreme Court Reporters, addresses a class of Plaza College Court Reporting students. // Photo courtesy of Plaza College

New Plaza College Class Begins Quest For 225 Words

Classes began at Plaza College in Forest Hills on Monday and for a crop of first-year students, that meant encountering a new and potentially lucrative device: the stenotype machine.

As many current court reporters near retirement, court reporting has become an in-demand job. As such, even new court reporters fresh out of training programs can earn close to six-figure salaries.

But first, students  must attain a writing rate of 225-words per minute on the 22-key stenotype machine, a tool that differs significantly from a typical QWERTY keyboard.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo sits with former Sen. Hillary Clinton at an event last week.//Photo by Philip Kamrass, Office of Gov. Cuomo

State Tackles Period Stigma By Mandating  School Access to Pads and Tampons

A new law that took effect at the beginning of the school year mandates that all public schools must stock pads and tampons and provide them free of charge to students in grades six through 12 starting.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the bill into law in July as  part of his Women’s Opportunity Agenda. The law addresses a problem that many girls face, but few talk about because of stigmas related to menstrual health.

“Many women in New York lack access to menstrual products, and for young women, this inequality can cause distraction and worry that may negatively affect their learning experience,” said U.S. Rep. Grace Meng from Queens.  “By making these essential feminine health products available in schools, we are helping young women become confident, successful adults.”

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Council Member Rory Lancman debated Assistant District Attorney James Quinn on the future of Rikers Island Wednesday. // Eagle photo by David Brand 

Lancman, Legal Aid Condemn ADA’s Browder Comments

In the days since Council Member Rory Lancman and Queens Senior Executive Assistant District Attorney James Quinn debated about the future of Rikers Island, one specific exchange about Kalief Browder has garnered national attention.

While defending the proposal to close jails on Rikers Island and open four “borough-based” jails, Lancman — a potential candidate in the 2019 Queens DA race — frequently described how the bail system keeps low-income defendants in detention simply because they cannot afford to the pay bail.

He cited the experience of Browder, a 16-year-old from the Bronx who was arrested for stealing a backpack and held on Rikers for three years — including two in solitary confinement — because he could not afford to pay bail. Ultimately, Browder’s C Felony charges were dismissed.

Two years after his release, Browder committed suicide.

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Margery Koveleski shows a picture of her family when they moved from New York City to Ohio, during an interview in the showroom of their store Design Sleep in Yellow Springs, Ohio on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018. It was initially a challenge for the Koveleskis’ children to be the new, mixed-race kids in an area less diverse than Queens. And Michael struggled to find work in the shaky post-9/11 economy. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

‘Wake-up call’: 9/11 prompted some to move away to new lives

On 9/11, Stephen Feuerman saw the World Trade Center aflame through the window of his Empire State Building office and watched, transfixed, as a second fireball burst from the twin towers.

He ran through the 78th floor urging everyone to get out, thinking their skyscraper could be next. With transit hubs shut down, he couldn’t get home to his family in suburban Westchester for hours. Among the dead were someone he knew from college and people he recognized from his commuter train.

Feuerman had always seen himself as a New Yorker, but “everything changed that day,” he says.

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